Through the Detroit Tree Equity Partnership, the City of Detroit is working to cool the corridors with trees and work to shield residents from blight by planting trees in front of businesses such as scrapyards. Photo by City of Detroit
   

 

HOME  I I  HI TECH NEWS  I SPORTS I CONTACT

 
 
 

"We are passionate about ensuring that every Detroiter, regardless of their backgrounds, gets a second chance to enter the workforce, contribute to the City's economic viability, and sustain themselves and their families," said Lionel Bradford, President of the Greening of Detroit. (Photo by HB Meeks/Tell Us USA News Network)

  DTEP tree planting being used to cool the city's corridors and screen blight, provides valuable job skills to Detroiters

Cooling Detroit's commercial corridors is one key goal in the massive tree-planting initiative
As crews work to reforest Detroit, trees are also being used to fight blight
Job training is available for 300 Detroiters through the Detroit Tree Equity Partnership


DETROIT- Today, city officials, residents, and partnering organizations joined to highlight the City's evolving planting initiative of bringing 75,000 trees to the streets of Detroit. This initiative is part of the City's continuing proactive management of our tree canopy, which began in 2016.

Through the Detroit Tree Equity Partnership, the City of Detroit is working to cool the corridors with trees and work to shield residents from blight by planting trees in front of businesses such as scrapyards. Since launching in 2022, 8,000 trees have been planted, and thousands more are expected to be planted in Fall 2023, focusing on the corridors of East Warren Avenue, West McNichols Road, and Joy Road and several neighborhoods with low canopy coverage and elevated heat island.

DTEP planting crews finishing up tree planting along West McNichols Road.

"Commercial corridors are a cornerstone of our communities," said Whitney Smith, Reforestation Manager, City of Detroit. "On W. McNichols, you can find everything from grocery stores, churches, restaurants, shopping boutiques, and nightlife. Trees improve the vibrancy of our corridors by increasing their walkability and beauty. They also improve environmental conditions. Our corridors have the highest traffic volumes outside freeways, which means higher pollution and carbon emissions. Trees along our corridors do nature's work of filtering pollutants carbon and provide microclimate cooling effects."

Reflecting on one year of planting, the DTEP is celebrating a successful inaugural year and the recent $ 3 million Community and Urban Forestry IRA award, which will allow for continued growth and stewardship of this initiative.

"American Forests could not be happier with the Detroit Tree Equity Partnership's progress during the first year," said Jenni Shockling, Senior Manager, American Forests. "DTEP has ambitious goals to plant and maintain 75,000 trees and train and place 300 residents in five years and, by working collaboratively, is on pace to meet or exceed those goals. We are excited to be planting in strategic corridors and high-visibility locations throughout the City and are excited about improving Tree Equity outcomes throughout the entire City."

Planting crews devotedly work to plant and maintain 75,000 trees throughout Detroit.

Additional trees in the City will have a positive ripple effect as officials stress that planting trees is necessary to maintain and increase canopy cover, optimize the benefits trees offer, and replace trees that have been removed or lost to natural mortality. Mature trees remove 48 pounds of carbon from the air per year, so in addition to cooling urban areas, each tree planted means cleaner air and lower asthma rates for Detroiters. With an increased focus on planting and establishing new trees to advance the City's sustainability and climate work, Detroit is on track to meet and significantly exceed its tree planting goals outlined in the Sustainability Action Agenda 1,000 trees annually, in zip codes with less than 20% canopy coverage.

"Tree equity goes beyond simply planting trees; it's an opportunity to reduce heat islands, provide shade for kids to play under in the summer, and create jobs for people in the Community," explained Jack Akinlosotu, Director, Detroit of Sustainability, City of Detroit.

Through the partnership with DTEP, along with The Greening of Detroit and DTE Energy, funds are available to hire and train Detroiters to handle the planting and maintenance of the trees with a certified pre-apprenticeship tree care program as an initiative committed to developing a tree care workforce.

DTEP planting crews walk neighbors and community partners through the planting process.

"We are passionate about ensuring that every Detroiter, regardless of their backgrounds, gets a second chance to enter the workforce, contribute to the City's economic viability, and sustain themselves and their families," said Lionel Bradford, President of the Greening of Detroit.

Greening of Detroit, the lead workforce development partner, developed its Detroit Conservation Corps (DCC) workforce development program in 2015 to provide disenfranchised Detroiters with an apprentice-based landscape training integrated with comprehensive support services to prepare participants for full-time employment in "green-collared" jobs. All DTEP crew members are trained in the DCC, which prioritizes providing quality, case-management, and assistive services to support individuals who have faced previous challenges to maintaining full-time employment, including those with a history of incarceration.

Once the tree planting initiative is complete, these residents can convert the skills they learned into good-paying jobs in the tree care industry. DTEP will build on this effort to develop career opportunities for Detroit residents in the tree care industry.

The DTEP workforce will focus on tree maintenance, planting, and establishment. Care like proactive pruning cycles improve the overall health of the tree population and may eventually reduce maintenance costs. In most cases, pruning cycles will correct tree defects before they worsen, which could avoid problems before they become severe and costly.





 

Advertise With Us:

mbe logo 100-012821 copy

Certified Minority Business Enterprise

 

 





 

                      


 

All Rights Reserved   2003-2023 Tell Us USA
Disclaimer  Policy Statement
Site Powered By Tell Us Worldwide Media Company - Detroit, Michigan. USA

 

Web
Analytics Made Easy - StatCounter

 

Web
Analytics Made Easy - StatCounter

 

Web
Analytics Made Easy - StatCounter

 

Web
Analytics Made Easy - StatCounter

 

Web
Analytics Made Easy - StatCounter

Web
Analytics Made Easy - StatCounter

 

Web
Analytics Made Easy - StatCounter